Paper Details  

Has Bibliography
14 Pages
3513 Words

    Filter Topics  

The Year 2000

Introduction Many may dismiss the predictions that there would be a worldwide chaos on January 1, 2000 as many computers programmed with two-digit year fields would mistake it to be 1900 and breakdown. However, we need not wait for the turn of the century for the trouble. Signs of early troubles are already everywhere to sufficiently warrant both IT and business managers to take the issue seriously, if they have not already done so. What seemed as a reasonable solution to costly storage problem in past, would now cost, by some estimates, 600 Billion dollars to organizations worldwide. No matter what the final cost comes out to be, even at conservative 300 billion dollars, it is no pocket change. All concern parties must have thorough understanding of the problem, its solutions, and possible ramifications. Importance of the Issue IT managers are not the only one who needs to understand the depth of Y2K problem. Business managers probably has more in stake here than any one else. If timely solutions are not achieved, many business stands to lose many billions of dollars in form of lost revenues. This loss does not include possible losses resulting from litigation and out-of-court settlements. Many firms, including some large ones, have continued to drag their feet on fixing Y2K related problems. Companies with Y2K problems now often cannot find people to work on those problems. Shortages of qualified people to work on Y2K projects are very evident globally. January 1st, 2000 is a non-flexible date that is sure to come without any mercy and possibility of extension. If companies are not addressing it by now, they are simply playing catch-up(14). The good news is that the technical know-how exists and many tools are available. For many organizations, problem can be adequately addressed even if they start now – but for a higher cost, of course. Historical Perspective In 1956, Howard Aiken, a computer pioneer from Harvard Univ...

Page 1 of 14 Next >

Bibliography "The Millennium-bug Muddle", The Economist, October 4, 1997, p.17. Radosevich, L. "Millennium bug already taking its toll," Infoworld, January 12, 1998, p. 1 & p. 19. "Please panic early: it may not be the end of world as we know it, but the year-2000 bug is already a very expensive nuisance.(Cover Story)," The Economist, Oct 4, 1997, p. 25. Anthes, G. "Contingency planning when disaster strikes," Computerworld, January 19, 1998, p. 80. "Beware the Millennium," The Economist, March 8, 1997p. 86. Maglitta, J. "Fair Warning," Computerworld, January 19, 1998, p. 94. "Don’t forget the basics," PC Week, March 2, 1998, p. 87. Neil, S. "2000 reasons to sue: CIOs are standing up for their rights on Y2K problems, but they may face liability themselves," PC Week, March 8, 1998, p. 83. Benson, M. "2000 bug: group seeks damages cap," The Wall Street Journal, December 10, 1997, p. CA1. Madden, J. "Smaller Companies Run Big Y2K Risks," PC Week, March 8, 1998, p. 88. Zirin, J. "Bugs bite, and lawyers litigate," Forbes, July 7, 1997, p. 100. Hammond, E. "Year-2000 testing issues: Cure for the uncommon test," Infoworld, December 29, 1997, p. 58. DiDio, L. "Wall Street to test y2K readiness," Computerworld, February 9, 1998, p. 1. Jagger, D. and Bergeon, R., Managing 00: Surviving the Year 2000, Wiley Computer Publishing, 1997. Neil, S. "Y2K: You Can’t Insure Your Way Out of This One," PC Week, March 8, 1998, p. 84.

    More on The Year 2000...

Copyright © 1999 - 2015 All Rights Reserved. DMCA