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means to tragic ends

Does man really have free will, or does free will lie within a system of limitations that gradually compose a web of circumstantial fate that ultimately cannot be torn apart? The events in both Oedipus The King and Antigone controversially suggests that man ultimately chooses his own deeds and endures fate and the responsibilities for them. These events brought by fate are unmistakably aggravated by certain characteristicswithin the characters. Oedipus, from Oedipus The King, Antigone, and Creon, both fromAntigone possess such flawed characteristics that lead to their tragic ends.Oedipus possesses a multitude of characteristics, some of them common to othercharacters, but pride is exceptionally prevalent. This characteristic, which margins withutter arrogance, appears to be one of the dominant flaws that causes Oedipus’ tragicdownfall. This is plainly established in the beginning of the play in which he states “IOedipus whom all men call the great.” (p11.8). This is strengthened by the Priest’sreplies of “...Oedipus, Greatest in all men’s eyes,” (p12.40) and “Noblest of men”(p12.46).However, pride is not the only characteristic which contributes to Oedipus’ tragicend. There exists his temper, which is initially presented in the argument betweenTeiresias and himself. After Teiresias speaks the truth as factual, Oedipus replies “Doyou imagine you can always talk like this, and live to laugh at it hereafter?” (p26.367)and then soon after calls Teiresias a “fool” (p29.433). His temper is also exposed whenhe threatens to banish or kill Creon after Creon’s attempted reasoning. Another contributing factor is his suspicion for others, this is evident where hequestions Teiresias “Was this your own design or Creon’s?” (p.27.377). He is falsely rationalizing that Teiresias is secretly plotting, in coalition with Creon, to overthro...

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