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wadswoths

To me alone there came a thought of grief: A timely utterance gave that thought (Ll.20-23)The quote above shows that the child’s ability to see pleasure becomes deeper and more meditative. The child is realizing that the surface pleasures do not have the same effect on him as they used to. Another quote that shows the transition is “Whither is fled the visionary gleam?”(l.56). Here the speaker asks the question of where his past pleasure has gone. He realizes that he has changed somewhat and is now looking towards the future. In the final stanzas, Wordsworth shows that the child has changed to the adult over the years. The light shines now from a mind that has grown philosophic in understanding a mind that has learned to live beneath more habitual sway of Fountains, Meadows, Hills, and Groves.(Hefernan 261) The influences of childhood are still around. The present “adult” can still see the pleasure of “The innocent brightness of a new-born day”(l.194). Russell Noyes agrees that “These first affections whatever they might be are yet the fountain light of all our day(145). Adults still possess an awareness of the joys and delight of childhood visions; however, through the course of time, the adult adds further depth in giving passion to the visions he used to have. William Wordsworth derives his strength from the passion with which he views nature. In “Ode: Intimations and Immorality,” the theme of the maturing heart is proved through the direct quotes of the poem. By starting with quotes of the simple scenes in nature, Wordsworth shows how quickly the “child” is pleased. Wordsworth ends with a more analytical analysis of the nature scenes in the way it gives pleasure to the adult. “In childhood, imagination opens up the glory and the infinitude of Nature: in manhood, Nature inspires human affections that will bring strengt...

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