peer group powers
- What are the reasons for the emerging power of peer groups in teenage years? While children develop, grow, and move into early adolescence, involvement with peers and the attraction of peer identification increases. As pre-adolescents begin rapid physical, emotional and social changes, they begin to question adult standards and the need for parental guidance. They find turning to friends more reassuring. And begin to pay less attention to parents and older caretakers. They begin to trust and seek guidance from friends whom are in the same position. Most primates feel safer in groups, and much like primates people feel protected while in close nit groups. Teenagers feel much safer when their own friends experience the same feelings and same problems. Turning to one who’s undergoing the same problem seems more logical to teens.
Groups often times work as one big person. A generally accepted standard become very important in groups. People who oppose the norm often times begin to feel pressure from group members. This is when peer pressure comes along. Teens often times retreat to the safety of friends when troubled or in pressure. If the group standard is much to powerful this is when individuals lose power the power emerges from the group as a whole. Peer groups become small societies and each groups grows stronger with time. Much like structural functionalism groups become entangled with routine and a common belief. One idea pushes another and so forth. Emerging power of peers groups is most powerful in the teenage years. This is because teenagers have not fully developed enough to stand up on their own. They need encouragement or examples from others in order to feel right. After the teenage years people become more independent. They feel more confident and less pressured. Peer groups begin to die out as soon as family starts to form. Families become smaller groups and new standards are formed within. Family breaks large groups into many smaller less powerful groups. But because of such closeness in family, standards become even greater.
The reason peer groups work, are due to many factors. During adolescence, parents and adolescents become more physically and psychologically distant from each other. This normal distancing is seen in decreases in emotional closeness and warmth, increases in parent-adolescent conflict and disagreement, and an increase in time adolescents spend with peers. Increases in family strains: divorce, economic struggles, and other problems have prompted teenagers to depend more on peers for emotional support. By the high school years, most teenagers report feeling closer to friends than parents. Peer groups emerged and family structure is swept under the carpet. Not until teens begin to feel more stable they stay in large peer groups.
During adolescence, peers play a large part in a young person's life and typically replace family as the center of a teen's social and leisure activities. But teenagers have various peer relationships, and they interact with many peer groups. Often "peer cultures" have very different values and norms. Groups are almost always a good thing. Emerging power in groups becomes very strong while teenagers stick closer together. Teens will always stick together in a time of distress, and when group’s stick tighter they become much stronger.


 
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- What are the reasons for the emerging power of peer groups in teenage years? While children develop, grow, and move into early adolescence, involvement with peers and the attraction of peer identification increases. As pre-adolescents begin rapid physical, emotional and social changes, they begin to question adult standards and the need for parental guidance. They find turning to friends more reassuring. And begin to pay less attention to parents and older caretakers. They begin to trust and seek guidance from friends whom are in the same position. Most primates feel safer in groups, and much like primates people feel protected while in close nit groups. Teenagers feel much safer when their own friends experience the same feelings and same problems. Turning to one who’s undergoing the same problem seems more logical to teens. Groups often times work as one big person. A generally accepted standard become very important in groups. People who oppose the norm often times begin to feel pressure from group members. This is when peer pressure comes along. Teens often times retreat to the safety of friends when troubled or in pressure. If the group standard is much to powerful this is when individuals lose power the power emerges from the group as a whole. Peer groups become small societies and each groups grows stronger with time. Much like structural functionalism groups become entangled with routine and a common belief. One idea pushes another and so forth. Emerging power of peers groups is most powerful in the teenage years. This is because teenagers have not fully developed enough to stand up on their own. They need encouragement or examples from others in order to feel right. After the teenage years people become more independent. They feel more confident and less pressured. Peer groups begin to die out as soon as family starts to form. Families become smaller groups and new standards are formed within. Family breaks large groups into many smaller less powerful groups. But because of such closeness in family, standards become even greater. The reason peer groups work, are due to many factors. During adolescence, parents and adolescents become more physically and psychologically distant from each other. This normal distancing is seen in decreases in emotional closeness and warmth, increases in parent-adolescent conflict and disagreement, and an increase in time adolescents spend with peers. Increases in family strains: divorce, economic struggles, and other problems have prompted teenagers to depend more on peers for emotional support. By the high school years, most teenagers report feeling closer to friends than parents. Peer groups emerged and family structure is swept under the carpet. Not until teens begin to feel more stable they stay in large peer groups. During adolescence, peers play a large part in a young person's life and typically replace family as the center of a teen's social and leisure activities. But teenagers have various peer relationships, and they interact with many peer groups. Often "peer cultures" have very different values and norms. Groups are almost always a good thing. Emerging power in groups becomes very strong while teenagers stick closer together. Teens will always stick together in a time of distress, and when group’s stick tighter they become much stronger.
 
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    Some topics in this essay  
 
    | emerging power | teens times | feel safer | begin feel | guidance friends |  
   
 
 
 
 
   
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